Laurie C. Miller, MD

Laurie is an internationally respected physician, researcher, author and educator. She comes to NCAP from the Tufts University School of Medicine, where she has conducted pioneering work as founder of the International Adoption Clinic. Laurie’s distinguished career at Tufts also includes current positions as a Professor of Pediatrics; an Adjunct Professor of Nutrition at the Friedman School for Nutrition Science and Policy; and an Adjunct Professor of Child Development at the Eliot Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development, Tufts University (Boston, USA). She was a Senior Research Fellow of the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute for several years before stepping down in 2015.

Laurie has served as a pediatric consultant in Egypt, China, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Russia, Romania, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Guatemala, Ukraine, India, Rwanda, and Uganda. In the Murmansk region of Russia, she oversaw an NIH-funded program to improve outcomes for orphanage residents. She established and oversees “Big Sisters” humanitarian projects in Baby Homes in Russia, Ukraine and India. She also currently is the Principal Investigator of a USAID-funded, six-year longitudinal randomized controlled trial to monitor and improve the health and nutritional status of impoverished children in rural Nepal, and serves as a consultant on zoonotic diseases to a World Bank-funded project in Nepal.

Laurie has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles and 30 chapters related to pediatrics, international child health and international adoption, as well as two books (The Handbook of International Adoption Medicine, Oxford University Press, and The Encyclopedia of Adoption [with C. Adamec], Facts on File). In addition to working with NCAP, she is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Child Psychiatry at St. Anne’s Hospital in Paris.

Consulting Areas

Laurie is available to consult, train, present, write scholarly articles or conduct research on numerous subjects relating to international adoption and related children’s issues.